Mar 152015
 

angry tweet bird art by john aslerona-72dpi

A Healthy Look at Anger

Hospital-Caused Deaths, Twitter Indicators, Heart Attack & Prevention

by Jesse Wolf Hardin

Plant Healer Magazine

The second greatest cause of deaths in this country are factors associated with conventional hospital care, from misdiagnosis to resistant infection and drug side effects, as my partner Kiva and I regularly lament.  Recently our esteemed herbalist friend Paul Bergner alerted us to a report in a 2013 edition of The Journal of Patient Safety, discussing extensive research indicating there are an estimated 400,000 deaths per year directly related to drug-based modern medicine and hospital care.  These statistics, you must admit, are downright alarming.  More than that, they flat-out piss me off… as they likely anger a good number of our Plant Healer readers as well!

But be careful how angry you get when you stop to think about this regrettable fact, with anger looking more and more like a primary preventable trigger of the numero uno cause of death: the approximately 600,000 women and men succumbing each year to a fatal heart attack.  That anger triggers HCV symptoms and gall bladder pain, I can personally attest.  But some curious researching of twitter messaging habits makes me think about the ol’ ticker as well.

protesting-twitter-bird-72dpiSocial Media data is increasingly being analyzed by healthcare researchers for a better understanding of disease patterns and causes.  According to a January 14th, 2015 science report on National Public twitter-bird-angry-72dpiRadio, the internet platform Twitter has provided some very telling statistics.  Of particular interest to this discussion, it was found that those places where the greatest number of angry “tweets” issue from, strongly correlated with those areas reporting the greatest number of deaths from heart attack.  As NPR science reporter Shankar Vedantam explained:

“There’s new work now that connects Twitter with heart disease, because it turns out that you can trace many tweets to the location from which they were sent. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and other schools traced these tweets and then they analyzed the language in the tweets to see if they were expressing anger, or love, or boredom. And they find, in an analysis of more than 1,300 counties, that the amount of anger expressed on Twitter is a very powerful predictor of heart disease in those counties. And in fact, anger, hostility and aggression on Twitter is better able to predict patterns of heart disease than 10 other leading health indicators, including smoking, obesity and hypertension.

Bergner points reminds us that correlation is at best indication, and does not equal causation: “Sometimes two things that seem causally correlated are both caused by something else. What if living in a high crime expensive polluted city causes heart attacks, and also causes people to be angry?  With obesity and heart attacks, the correlation disappears when you remove insulin resistance, the insulin resistance causes the obesity and it causes the heart attacks.”

Yet, even if a direct causative relationship between anger and heart attacks remains unproven, it would seem to be their mutual causes that need to be determinedly addressed.  

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There is much to be upset about, and crucial for a healer of any kind – herbalist, nurse, nurturer, culture-shifter – empathize with, hurt over, take exception to, and try to address, confront, transform, or otherwise heal.  Dwelling in our pain and anger, however, is likely to do more damage to our health than bring justice to the world.  Instead, acting on our feelings can vent dangerous pent-up frustration, releasing tension through direct action and purposeful effort regardless of how successful such efforts and acts are.  I am angry over the persecution of herbalists and marginalizing of herbalism, and the threat posed by pharmaceuticals.  I’m ticked-off about the lying and manipulative politicians of both parties who continue destroying the environment and supporting corporatism and war, riled at the disappearance of wild habitat for plants and animals and free spirited people, upset with onerous regulation and oppressive laws, disgusted with bioengineered foods and proprietary seeds.  And thus, my preventative treatments for possible future heart attacks include helping to gather, store and promote wild seed varieties, protesting against or working to change unjust laws, purchasing and restoring a riparian ecosystem and encouraging its plant and wildlife, refusing to vote for what we imagine to be the “lesser of two evils”… and supporting the herbal resurgence against all odds, in every ways possible.  With every strenuous effort I make, I can feel the anger resolve into calm deliberate purpose, feel the tension dissolving in my weight bearing shoulders, my busy head, and my still beating chest.

Most official and unofficial websites discussing heart failure give us the same, not always correct recommendations.  According to the MNT Knowledge Center, for example, the steps to preventing heart attack are:

1. Follow instructions on medications usage (!)

2. Make sure diet is low in salt, fat, and cholesterol (even though nutritional cholesterol has been proven to have no significant effect on the levels of harmful cholesterol in the blood!)

3.  Exercise in the form of a 10-minute walk…

4. Quit smoking, and

5. Avoid drinking alcohol.

Hell’s-bells, as my Papa used to say!  No mention of herbs, of course.  Not a single word about not bottling-up our emotions, or making changes in where and how we live.  Maybe we should add a fifth recommendation:

keep-calm-and-dont-get-mad-get-even-72dpi

5. Don’t get angry, get even! (in other words, take charge of our own health, and work to change the dominant system!)

With that calmly considered amendment, I think I’ll ask our partner Kiva – the blender of genuinely remarkable Margaritas – if she’ll kindly fix me a drink.

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  One Response to “A Healthy Look At Anger”

  1. Well Jesse, that was a real article! Thank you. And it was just what I needed to read. Usually, I am a pretty calm person but today I have had my share of computer issues, customer service that downright sucks, 45 minute hold times that lead nowhere and now, password issues that won’t allow me to log on to a site to view a 90 minute video (that I think I don’t really want to view tonight anyway). I love my computer gadgets but I am getting to where I hate my computer gadgets! In a way it makes me laugh because it reminds me of my dad getting a computer and, ultimately, threatening to use a sledgehammer on it. He got rid of it but at the time I couldn’t understand his frustration; now I do. Yet, I am more tied to the computer life than he is so I am voluntarily stuck.

    I enjoyed your article because I can so relate to it on every point you mentioned but, also, because you were real. “Hells-bells” made me laugh and asking Kiva to make you a drink just sounded divine. Again, thanks for the lightening of my frustrating day. Ali

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