Green Olive & Almond Pomegranate Relish

This relish is an Enchanted Pantry twist on one of the more unusual Mediterranean recipes.  You can eat it right away, but it gets even better overnight.  It’s great mixed with some yogurt and eaten with pita or other fresh bread, with maybe a little hummus alongside.  Carnivores will especially enjoy it served with any wood grilled cuts, wild meats, a pork roast or chicken, or even atop a perfectly seasoned meatloaf. 1 cup good quality green olives, pitted and chopped 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3/4 cup chopped toasted almonds 1/4 cup chopped parsley or watercress 1/2 cup fresh pomegranate seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1-2 teaspoons brown sugar, to taste Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl, cover...

Rose Vinegar: My Favorite Sunburn Soother

Rose vinegar is supremely easy to make and has about a million uses. Here’s how you make it: get yourself a jar, fill it about halfway with dried Rose petal or leaves, or all the way up with fresh petals and/or leaves. Fill to top with a high quality apple cider vinegar. Let infuse for at least two weeks, and preferably six weeks. A plastic lid will prevent the Rose vinegar from eating through the normal metal canning lids (turns your vinegar black too, very unpleasant). Your vinegar will turn a lovely shade of reddish pink to brilliant ruby if you use colorful petals (dunno how yellow comes out it, I’ve never used them). A cloth can be soaked in this lovely preparation (dilute to 1 part vinegar to about 7-10 parts water) can be used placed on the...

Best Beaver Sauce

This is Loba and I’s favorite way to cook up Beaver meat. I prefer fresh tomatoes or homemade tomato sauce but we’ve given the ingredients in easy to find materials for your convenience. This is a simple and tasty recipe and can easily be adapted to become beaver chili or something similar. It’s also excellent plain, wrapped up in some brined grape leaves. extra virgin olive oil 1 large onion, diced 5 cloves garlic, minced 1 pint jar beaver meat 1 big can whole tomatoes 1 small can tomato paste 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sage 2 teaspoons bee balm or oregano lots of black pepper 1 cup red wine Saute the onion and garlic in the olive oil, add the rest of the ingredients, and smush the tomatoes with your hands. Add some more water if it seems a bit...

The Forager’s Song

The Forager’s Song

  As much as I love all local foods, there’s something truly special about wild, totally uncultivated food growing right at my feet, and in the case of the Wild Grapes, dangling right above my head. There’s a vitality to be had in wild river-grown Watercress that the best cultivated varieties can’t even compete with. The sharp bite of Mustard, the sweet crunch of Wild Lima flowers and the fine flavor of fresh Cottontail brings me back to my body, and closer to this particular stretch of enlivened land. Late afternoon often finds me waiting out the heat down by the river. After floating on my back down the cool current I usually gather greens for dinner in the shade of the Cottonwoods and Alders. Come summer, I’ll be able to curl up in...

Golden Flax Bread

Golden Flax Bread

For those of us unable to eat grains in any form, bread can seem like a thing of the past. I went years without eating bread, much to my great sadness. And then, I discovered flax! I’d made flax crackers before and they’re great but I had no idea flax could become something firm, fluffy and yummy — something very like bread! This is my basic recipe, it’s very simple and any part can be modified to suit you needs, it’s really not the kind of thing that falls apart with any variation or omission. In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever made it the same way twice! I haven’t tried it as a yeasted bread, so I’m not sure how that would work, but I aim to try. Amazingly, this bread is really really good. I’ve tried...

Elderberry Sparkle: A Beginner’s Guide to Lacto-Fermented Herbal Brews

I do a lot of brewing here. This is in part to compensate for the lack of refrigeration at the center but also just because I love the process of fermentation. I make homemade wines and ales of all kinds, but want to start here with a basic primer for Lacto-Fermented Herbal Brews because they’re easy, quick and you and your children can drink them to your heart’s content. The herbal sparkles are fizzy and tongue-tingly, and depending on the culture you use, they can also have a bit of a sour bite to them. Very yummy, and a great alternative to most commercial beverages out there. Make a quart of herbal infusion. Yarrow, Elderberry or Chamomile are all good starting points. Let it infuse for several hours then strain. Add a couple tablespoons of sugar...