Good News – Cellulitis Update

I’m happy to say that this case of cellulitis (see previous post) has been much easier to treat than the one earlier this year. Today, Loba’s walking around fairly easily, almost no redness in the foot and just a little swelling. We continue to do the soaks, poultices and internal tinctures, but I expect she’ll be completely back to normal in a matter of days. Yippee! Plantain, Alder and Beebalm formed the core of my treatment here, and have proven themselves over and over in stubborn infections from a variety of causes. These are nice simple herbs, all commonly available as weeds in North America or easily grown. The Peach fixed that wasp sting right up too, it’s good and dependable that way.

Green Chile Season & Another Case of Cellulitis

Green Chile Season & Another Case of Cellulitis

This may be the best time of year in the SW – the ground is moist, the garden is full, the weather cool and the green chiles roasting. Green Chiles are good in damn near anything, this morning for breakfast I had an apple, a wedge of extra sharp chedder chees and a pile of freshly roasted green chiles. Around here, you can find an outdoor vendor with a roaster selling green chiles (usually with a choice of mild, medium or hot) in almost any village or city, most of the chiles coming from the nearby green chile capital of the world: Hatch, NM. You buy them by the pound, and while our current 35 lbs (weighed when fresh, less after being roasted, even less after being skinned and seeded) sounds like a lot, I assure you that I’ll be looking for more very...

Bitters: Beverages with Moxie – Guest Post by Susan Belsinger

Susan Belsinger, herbal author and kind reader of the Medicine Woman’s Roots has graciously contributed a guest post to my blog for this month’s blogparty. This interesting and informative article even includes a good many recipes for using bitters in tasty recipes. Bitters, Beverages with Moxie Arthur O. Tucker and Susan Belsinger Many of our pre- and post-prandial tipples have a long, distinguished history as herb mixtures to cure ailments.  For example, Benedictine dates from about 1510, when the Dom Bernardo Vincelli at Fécamp, France discovered an “elixir” to revive tired Benedictine monks, and he even claimed that it cured local fishermen and peasants of malaria.  We know that Benedictine today contains lemon balm, arnica, hyssop, maidenhair...

Peach Twig: Effective Treatment for Assassin Bug Bites

Peach Twig: Effective Treatment for Assassin Bug Bites

One of the more annoying of the canyon bugs is a variety of assassin bug commonly called the cone-nosed kissing beetle. These little blood-sucking creatures are silent, and it doesn’t hurt when they bite you, at least not at first. Usually by the time you notice the bite, the bug has bitten you several times and then wandered off to find more victims. In about ten minutes though, you’ll know you were bitten by the insane, mind consuming itc accompanied by a sense of numbness and pain that starts to spread from the bite site outwards, often affecting a large majority of the body. Not only that, it can last for days (usually about 48 hours). Allergic reactions are possible but rare, even in people sensitive to other bug bites or stings. Not so much fun....

Relax Already: Selected Nervine Differentials

Relax Already: Selected Nervine Differentials

  Here you’ll find indications and specifics for a small number of relaxing nervine herbs. I have not chosen the most popular remedies of commerce but rather the plants I have worked with most intimately and who I have used time and time again. I’m not attempting to give you a huge overview of all the ways they can be used either, instead I’m laying out the ways I have seen each herb excel and pointing out some of the connections and insights I have gained through my relationships with them. Previous posts on specific herbs are linked to in the title heading of that herb. You can find a past incarnation of my Nervine Differentials right here. Some bits of it can be found integrated into this current post, but most of this is new, refined or...

Rose Vinegar: My Favorite Sunburn Soother

Rose vinegar is supremely easy to make and has about a million uses. Here’s how you make it: get yourself a jar, fill it about halfway with dried Rose petal or leaves, or all the way up with fresh petals and/or leaves. Fill to top with a high quality apple cider vinegar. Let infuse for at least two weeks, and preferably six weeks. A plastic lid will prevent the Rose vinegar from eating through the normal metal canning lids (turns your vinegar black too, very unpleasant). Your vinegar will turn a lovely shade of reddish pink to brilliant ruby if you use colorful petals (dunno how yellow comes out it, I’ve never used them). A cloth can be soaked in this lovely preparation (dilute to 1 part vinegar to about 7-10 parts water) can be used placed on the...