Apr 152014
 

 Kiva with Enchanted Healer cover 1-72dpi

Enchanted Healer Books Now Shipping!

I’m excited to report that the boxes of full color Enchanted Healer books have arrived from the printer!  And they came out great!  The thickness of the paper and vibrancy of the full color pages makes it really stand out.  This morning our daughter Rhiannon and I boxed up the many U.S. pre-orders and we’re shipping them from town today, Priority 1st Class.  International orders will ship on Friday.  Domestic orders should start arriving at your homes and p.o. boxes very soon.  Hurrah!

I should tell you that I’ve decided to also publish The Enchanted Healer later on Amazon.com later, in order to reach way beyond our herbalist, healer and nature lover community… but because of their limits on color book length, it will appear there as two separate volumes – Book I and II – and will therefore cost regular buyers twice as much as what it costs you, our tribe.

And we’ll have copies for you to peruse at this year’s Plant Healer event, the 2014 HerbFolk Gathering in Arizona in September, hope to see you there!  (Go to the Events page at: www.PlantHealer.org)

Below is my overview of this beautiful book, excerpted from the Spring issue of Plant Healer Magazine for any of you who haven’t gotten to read it yet, and for any of you who have blogs or newsletters that you’d be willing to share it through.  If you do, thank you!

If you haven’t already, you can order your personal copy from the Bookstore page at: www.PlantHealer.org

Thank you much, and Spring Blessings from all of us…   Kiva

 

Enchanted Healer Shipping Party!

Enchanted Healer Shipping Party!

Enter the Portal:
Becoming The Enchanted Healer

by Kiva Rose

The Enchanted Healer is one who has gone to that other world, been changed, and committed himself or herself to the All Life, and in a real and often painful manner, died to the mechanical world.  She or he no longer seeks the approval of the skeptic, but rather to heal all things, to bring them into right relationship with all others.  The boring world stops at the door of Earth-with-a-Soul.  I hope you readers enjoy this journey into the enchantment of the Healer as much as I have.”
Matthew Wood, Herbalist

The Enchanted Healer is a new book whose mission is to enchant the reader, assisting us in maintaining and growing a sense of enchantment in our daily lives as well as in our individual healing practices. Its art and insight cast a spell invigorating our curiosity and wonder, our inquiry and our ecstasy. Author Jesse Wolf Hardin invites us “to and through the portal of awakeness and awareness to a place of discovery and delight,” a wholly interconnected world rich with the wisdom, beauty and power of inspirited Nature.

The “Healers” this book seeks to empower, excite and celebrate come in many forms, not only the Herbalist and Physician, Acupuncturist and Naturopath, but also the Nurturer from gardeners and conservationists to caring parents and artful cooks, the envisioning Seer, the spirit-mending Shaman, and the paradigm-changing CultureShifter…. not just helping heal bodies but feelings and spirits, family and community, society and the endangered living land.  As Wolf writes:

“Healers help assist, adjust, counterbalance, shift, direct, nurture and mend… Healing is an active contribution to the balance, integrity and expression of a whole that is and should be always dynamic, morphing, unfolding, improving, and revealing.”

We each come to the portal of our enchantment the same as we come to our healing paths: in our own personal ways, following a circuitous route that is as unpredictable and magical as it is deliberate and planned.

The Journey to My Enchantment

My Journey To Enchantment

“Faërie contains many things besides elves and fays, and besides dwarfs, witches, trolls, giants, or dragons; it holds the seas, the sun, the moon, the sky; and the earth, and all things that are in it: tree and bird, water and stone, wine and bread, and ourselves, mortal men, when we are enchanted.”
J. R. R. Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories

I was first drawn to the work of the Healer through my experiences of spending time with plants. Down on my hands and knees in the grass, surrounded by the wild plants I was only beginning to know the names of, I could easily become lost for hours at a time in the detail of their intricate leaf veins or trailing roots or by the way they moved in the wind and rain. Even in the small patches of woodland oasis amidst the surrounding urban chaos I would find myself transported into another world by the patterns of light flickering across dew-damp wildflowers. These threads of wildness that wove through the city were surrounded on every side by traffic, but still insulated me from the harsh sounds and often frantic pace of the human world. In my green havens I could slip into a sort of reverie, and imagine myself in Tolkien’s tree guarded Lothlorien or the forbiddingly dark forests of Grimm’s fairy tales.

As a homeless teenager, I spent many nights in city parks, climbing up into welcoming branches and sleeping with my legs and arms wrapped around the comforting body of a living tree. I told my secrets to their leaves, and listening to them whisper back with every small breeze. While some seek talismans in technology or human wrought things, I have always found my portal into the otherworld through the plants. One taste of a feral Mulberry or inhalation of Honeysuckle on a humid night can send my senses reeling past the veil and into a Faery touched landscape. Not only have plants ignited my passion and imagination for most of my life, they’ve also provided me with focus, love, and direction in my darkest hours. Learning how the weeds I grew up with could tend the wounds of the body, as well as those of the heart and spirit, only drew me further into the enchantment that began with my first memory of a Yarrow flower as a toddler.

As fellow lovers of plants, I know that you – too – have come to this journey and mission as much out of love and passion as practicality or necessity. You more than likely recognize something magical in the effects of medicinal herbs and in the very processes of healing and repair.

“The plants have open our minds and hearts to new ways of looking at the world and your purpose within it, revealed the presence of spirit in all things and the potential for apparent miracles in our practices and lives.”

The Enchanted Healer book, too, is not only a resource but a revealing… of “how wonderful we can feel, of all we can be, of all the possible ways we can help ourselves, others, and this world to heal.”

Kiva with Enchanted Healer open 2-72dpi

Envisioning & Manifesting

In The Enchanted Healer, Wolf also discusses the many ways in which a Healer can manifest, providing a look at the twists and turns of how we practice, and how far that healing can extend:

“A mark of a Healer is feeling drawn – compelled, even – to try to ease suffering and help remedy unwellness, unwholeness and imbalance wherever and whenever it is encountered. This often manifests in careers as health care providers, but also shows up as hospice work and counsel for the dying, a dedication to plant conservation or land restoration, habitat protection or wildlife rehabilitation, and even stopping to comfort a lost kitten we see. The instinct to help and heal seldom ends here, however, and often extends to empathy for the homeless and volunteer work on their behalf. Awareness of the corporados’ destruction of the last wild places, and activism to address it. Soon it can get to the point that it would feel hypocritical to help a woman with bruises on her face without trying to free her from an abusive relationship, perhaps even volunteering at a shelter. Or to administer herbs unless we know they are from a sustainable and ethical source. Or to make a good income from a healing practice without donating some time or money to those who cannot afford health care. Or to meekly conduct an under-the-radar practice without facing or taking a stand on increasingly onerous regulations.”

The Enchanted Healer covers subjects as diverse as Healer archetypes, plant spirit, plant and animal totems, utilizing and heightening our physical senses, so-called extrasensory perception, eros and sexuality, the magic of cooking, self care and nourishment, Anima and the vital life force, Gaia the living Earth, healing vision quests and places of power, and creating sanctum and sanctuary for ourselves. It is a book intended to both inform and inspire, to clarify and create space for further imaginings and understandings:

“To ‘envision’ is not simply to foresee or forecast, but to recognize patterns and possibilities, to mentally create ideas that beg to be acted on and tested, models that can then be sculpted, manifested, realized in the physical reality. To continue on a path, we must either see or envision the way ahead. To treat a symptom of bodily, cultural or ecological disease, we conceive of its causes, and imagine the best possible treatments, acting on not only what we already know and can see, but also on our growing understanding and experience of the unseen.”

We need not only inspiration, but also clarity, discernment, focus and follow-through. It’s so easy to become diffuse and pulled in too many directions as a Healer. By the very nature of our vocation, we Healers must be multifaceted, but the complex and competing work of study, clinical work, medicine making, sorting through current research, botany, activism, gardening, wildcrafting, and much more can be overwhelming and lead to a feeling of being pulled in too many directions. Wolf effectively breaks down many of the most vital elements and aspects of being a Healer, and makes them accessible, exciting, and achievable for all of us.

The Inner Sanctum www.PlantHealer.org

The Enchanted Healer also provides in depth insights into the working practice of the Healer, and delves into the vital importance of self care. Many of us fall madly in love with our vocation, pouring our whole selves into studying, practicing, and endlessly striving to become better at the mending and nourishing that healing entails. But at some point most of us will find ourselves at a crossroads, wondering whether we are good enough to deserve the title of Healer, when tending others has taken its toll on our energy levels, when the complexity of physiology and chemistry is overwhelming, and when we don’t know if we can continue down this path with more support and strength.

On those days when we wake up tired and worn down from our work, what we most often need is self nourishment, and the time to re-emerge ourselves in the enchantment that first drew us to healing in the first place. Once exhausted, it can be difficult to even remember what that was, or it can seem faded out or inaccessible when seen through such tired eyes. The Enchanted Healer both looks honestly at this important subject, and also suggests ways in which to nourish the self and recharge:

“We can only optimally nourish others, of course, when we have and continue to nourish our selves, our body with all its hungers, our emotional and spiritual needs, tending and feeding and watering all that we need to heal, strengthen, deepen, manifest, and bloom. Whatever your role in this life, you will be better at it and more satisfied with it if you take the time – and do what it takes – to nurture your inherent gifts and talents, imagination and creativity, ideas and desires, calling and missions, hopes and dreams.

It is then that we can best nurture other people, their well-being and their dreams as well as the community we are a part of and the land that needs us. It is as Nurturers, too, that we make things better. And it is making things better that makes us Healers.”

The Enchanted Healer art by Jesse Wolf Hardin

The Beauty & Song

The Enchanted Healer is beautifully illustrated with over 650 photos and paintings by many talented artists including Wolf and our friends Katlyn Breene, Lauren Raine and Madeline von Foerster, with its look and feel intended to be an important component in the spell this book weaves. Words and images merge to create a portrait of a magical life, a Healer both enchanted and enchanting, and opening a portal into the storybook forest. Turning the pages is choosing to walk through the open door, and step into a mushroom marked fairy ring where the ancient dance of the healing arts continues each and every moment. As Wolf tells us:

“Enchantment is not about being bewitched or bewildered, it is a healthy glamour that amazes us with revelations of magic in the mundane, of significance in the overlooked, misunderstood or undervalued. It is neither hallucination, feel-good diversion, self delusion, sleight of hand tricks or entertainment. It is allure, necessarily followed by engagement with what fascinates us engagement with the ever so real world and our work within it… albeit a world that will always be at least in part a wonderful mystery, and everyday healing work that is northing less than extraordinary – not so much credible as incredible, not so much known and conventional as mysterious, adaptive, and mind blowing… with effects and results that can be astounding, awe inspiring, and incontrovertibly phenomenal.

The Enchanted Healer www.PlantHealer.org

The portal to our enchantment is often closer than we think, disguised as something common but betrayed by a faint smell of wild herbs, ocean fog, or forest moss, or concealed by Fir and Spruce boughs sweetly singing in the wind.”

Enchantment is the place of magic and meaning where we gather, and where we recognize each other. The gift of the book The Enchanted Healer is not only that it awakens and empowers our lives and practices, but also that it brings us together.

I’ll meet you there.

–Kiva Rose

Kiva with Enchanted Healer open 1-72dpi

Enchanted Healer by Jesse Wolf Hardin  www.PlantHealer.orgTable of Contents 2-72dpi

Order from the Bookstore page at: www.PlantHealer.org

(please re-post and share… thank you)

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