Wise Woman Style Infusions

So many new students have been asking about infusion directions that I thought I’d just do a basic post on it here. I find infusions to be a really useful and simple way to get a lot of plant matter and energy, as well as a lot of vitamins and minerals into a person on a consistent basis. I studied with Susun Weed so I’m quite influenced by her lovely nourishing philosophy.

These kinds of infusions are best made with super nutritive food-like herbs. Herbs that might fit into this category include Oatstraw, Nettles, Violet, Borage, Comfrey (depending on your state of mind about PLAs), Red Clover, Raspberry leaf, Rose leaf, Rose petals, Mallow, Mullein, Elderflower, Elderberry, Hawthorn leaf/flower, Linden flowers, Alfalfa, Peach leaf and so on and so forth. Dandelion root can also be made this way but I do prefer a decoction for woody bits and roots.

Ingredients:
1 Quart jar with lid
1 oz of dried plant material (about a cup of leafy material like Nettles, more for light flowers like Red Clover and less for heavy roots and barks)
boiling water

Place plant matter in jar, fill jar with just boiled water, cover with airtight lid. Let steep 4-8 hours, preferably overnight. Strain out plant matter and reserve liquid (you can give the plant matter to your garden or compost). The rest of the process is really determined by personal taste. Some people like infusions warmed up, some like them cold. Some like them with a bit of honey, some don’t.

Also, Susun teaches to use jut one plant a time when making infusions especially at first so we know what we’re reacting to if we have a reaction. I tend to start with one plant, work with it for a while, then keep it as the primary influence while adding some balancing or harmonizing plants.

For instance, here in the hot dry SW, I almost always add a bit of moistening Mallow leaf to my Nettle infusions. Another example is my current favorite adrenal blend made primarily of Nettles and Borage with pinches of Mallow and Rose.

A note of caution: Some of these plants, like Nettles, can be a bit bowel loosening at first. Especially in a quart dose. So start with a pint or less, and drink it throughout the day instead of in one fell swoop (better for assimilation anyhow). Pay attention to how your body responds and act accordingly (if some plant gives you a splitting headache or an itchy rash, stop drinking it).

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  1. The Medicine Woman’s Roots » Moistening Herbs for Dry Winters - [...] my everyday nourishing infusions of Nettles or Raspberry or Oatstraw I add a pinch of two of a slippery …

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